Much Ado About Nothing: Thoughts Specific and General

English and Things

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Hello!

Below are the key scenes we’ll be focussing on when we start to look at Much Ado About Nothing next term:

I.i
II.i
II.iii
III.i
III.v
IV.i
V.iv

Note that these are the only scenes we’ll be reading (performing) in class.
You’ll find the first few lessons a lot more fun if you’re already familiar with the play and its characters, so do have a little look at it in advance. The Kenneth Branagh film is a triumph.

Additionally, below are the topics we’ll be focussing on once we’ve made our way through the set scenes:

1. Structure and Rom-com: Much Ado About Nothing and Anchorman
I.i, II.i, II.iii, III.i, IV.i, V.ii
In what way does the structure of Much Ado About Nothing contribute to its effectiveness as a comedy?

2. Dis/order in Much Ado About Nothing
II.i, II.iii (B&B) IV.i, IV. ii, V.i, V.iv
Explore the relationship beween…

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‘My Last Duchess’: A Marxist Reading

Using the ideas from the Critcal Anthology on Marxism, write about Browning’s poem, ‘My Last Duchess’. In your answer, you may wish to consider some of the following points:

The duke could represent the bourgeoisie. He has reduced the status of his (now dead) wife from that of a human being to an object. Under his government, nothing is free – even his ‘gift’ of a ’900 year old name’ is an exchange of power, to be ‘ranked’ alongside gifts from others. The Duke’s refusal to ‘stoop’ – ‘I choose never to stoop’ shows the hostility towards change which so often characterises those who hold the means of production. It is significant that he uses the word ‘choose’ which draws attention to his freedom and autonomy – luxuries the proletatiat do not have. Furthermore, the Duke’s dictatorial qualities may well remind us of figures such as Stalin; he is willing to ‘stop’ those who pose a threat to the status quo.

The duchess could represent the socialist of views of those such as Marx and Engels. She doesn’t subscribe to the dominant, hierarchical ideology of capitalism, but values all ‘gifts’ equally – they ‘draw from her alike the approving speech’. She views herself and others as equals, and is, in this respect, absolutely counter-cultural.

Fra Pandolf could represent the proletariat. It is not he who paints the Duchess, but his ‘hands’. Rather than viewing him as an individual, the Duke devalues him according to that which he can produce.

The final image of the poem is definitely worth exploring. How does a bronze sculpture of Neptune taming a sea-horse help to enhance the poem’s Marxist themes?

English and Things

Using the ideas from the Critcal Anthology on Marxism, write about Browning’s poem, ‘My Last Duchess’. In your answer, you may wish to consider some of the following points:

The duke could represent the bourgeoisie. He has reduced the status of his (now dead) wife from that of a human being to an object. Within this system, nothing is free – even his ‘gift’ of a ‘900 year old name’ is an exchange of power. The Duke’s refusal to ‘stoop’ – ‘I choose never to stoop’ shows the hostility towards change which is characteristic of the bourgeoisie. It is significant that he uses the word ‘choose’ which draws attention to his freedom and autonomy – luxuries the proletatiat do not have. Furthermore, the Duke’s dictatorial qualities may well remind us of figures such as Stalin in that he is willing to kill off those who pose a threat to his…

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