AS English Literature: Work for the Easter Holidays

Hi!

Work to be completed over the Easter holidays is below:

Aspects of Narrative – four-way comparison pack

Exploring Aspects of Narrative

Practice Exam Questions

1. Read through the pack on ‘Exploring Aspects of Narrative’.

2. Use the questions therein to help you fill in the tables in the ‘Four-Way Comparison Pack’.

3. Answer TWO of the practice exam questions – one from Section A and one from Section B.

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Year 11: Easter Holiday Revision

Hello!

Over the Easter Holidays I would like you to do three things:

1. Focus on the Unseen Poetry section of the English Literature exam. Complete all the revision tasks in the booklet you have been given.

2. Design your own English Language exam. Have a look at this one: English Language exam

and use it as a template for creating your own. You will find it helpful to read this document on the The Six Different Types of Questions in the English Language Unit 1 GCSE exam

You should also write your own mark scheme.

3. Complete any of the revision tasks on this blog that are still outstanding:

Revision Tasks

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7D: Easter Holiday Homework

Dear 7D,

Don’t forget that your homework for the Easter holidays is to find examples of ‘Apostrophe Abuse’ in the Real World. It may be that the apostrophe has been used incorrectly, or, because it has not, sadly, been used at all, as in the example below:

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Keep your eyes peeled.

Ms. North

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Spotted in Chichester, where kids love stuffing toys in their spare time.
©SFletcher2012

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What is/are your Learning Style/s?

Let’s not limit it to one. You’ve probably got quite a few, if you’re anything like me. Sometimes, I find I learn (or indeed, teach) things better when I’m using more than one ‘style’ at the same time.

Click here to find out your learning styles…